Welcome to The Royal Cruising Club


RCC

The Royal Cruising Club was founded in 1880 by Sir Arthur Underhill and a coterie of friends to encourage and facilitate cruising in small yachts. Members, then as now, contributed to the enjoyment and safety of others by writing accounts of their cruises for the Club Journal and publishing coastal guides.

Many familiar sailing names have been RCC members: Claud Worth, Erskine Childers, Tilman, Miles and Beryl Smeeton, and that other remarkable couple Eric and Susan Hiscock, whose lifetime of voyaging inspired countless long distance sailors.

The Club's prime objective remains the furtherance of cruising under sail and its membership, by invitation only and limited to four hundred, enjoys the same friendly intimacy as Underhill's group of Victorian sailing eccentrics.

Roving Commissions


RCC

Roving Commissions is the annual Journal of the Royal Cruising Club and is an anthology of RCC members' cruises for the year.

RCC Members may purchase additional copies at a member's special price through the online shop available through the RCC Members' Area.

Non members of the RCC may purchase a single hard copy of the latest edition of the Journal (for despatch to a UK address) by clicking on the "Purchase Roving Commissions (Hard Copy)" button below and paying by PayPal, credit card, or debit card. Those wishing to pay by another means, order multiple copies/back copies or for the order to be dispatched overseas, should follow the instructions which can be downloaded by clicking here.

Alternatively the Kindle version can be purchased from Amazon by clicking on the "Purchase Roving Commissions (Kindle Version)" button below

Never Fear – Reliving the Life of Sir Francis Chichester by Ian Strathcarron

A new biography of Sir Francis Chichester, the first for 40 years, by RCC member, Ian Strathcarron

Never Fear follows in the footsteps and wakes of Sir Francis’s life of adventure, adversity and triumph. Born in 1901 into a troubled childhood in rural Devon, he suffered through the sadism of the English public school system, then in 1918 left for New Zealand where he made his first fortune. There he took up flying and in 1930 became one of the first aviators to fly from London to Sydney. After being the first solo flyer across the Tasman Sea from New Zealand to Australia, he set off to circle the world, only to crash, nearly fatally, in Japan.

After serving in the RAF in the Second World War, he took up sailing at the age of fifty-four and in twelve years became the most famous yachtsman in the world. Along the way there are struggles and triumphs, climaxing in being knighted with Sir Francis Drake’s sword in Greenwich. Ian Strathcarron, himself an aviator, yachtsman and adventurer, follows him all the way, comparing what Sir Francis found then to what he finds now, meeting the descendants of the people who played important parts in his life and getting under the skin of what made the man, the man.

This book is published by the Unicorn Publishing Group, www.unicornpress.org

Ian Strathcarron is the author of the travel biographies Vasco da Gama’s Grand Crusade, Joy Unconfined! Lord Byron’s Grand Tour Retoured, the Mark Twain travel trilogy Innocence and War, The Indian Equator and Mississippi Mayhem and the philosophy works Living with Life and Mysticism and Bliss. He is also Chairman of Unicorn Publishing Group and a mediator with the cultural property ADR service Art Resolve.





Blue Water Medal Awarded to Tom and Vicky Jackson

The Cruising Club of America (CCA) has selected Tom and Vicky Jackson to receive its 2015 Blue Water Medal.

The Blue Water Medal was established in 1923 to recognize “a meritorious example of seamanship.” The Jacksons were cited for their extensive cruising and racing over the past 34 years aboard their 40’ Sparkman & Stephens-designed Sunstone. On the now nearly 50-year-old sloop, they covered close to 200,000 miles, including a circumnavigation. The medal will be presented at the Club’s annual Awards Dinner in New York on March 4, 2016.
The Jacksons met 45 years ago while crewing together in the Fastnet Race. They married thereafter in 1972 and, except for a short pause, have been cruising and racing since. Starting in 1978 they lived aboard a 31' Kim Holman design on the East Coast of England. They bought Sunstonein 1981, and moved aboard her, residing first on the East Coast and later in the Hamble, England. The couple initially raced Sunstone in numerous British offshore racing events, and during the period from 1982 to 1997 they collected a series of class and overall victories, including the British Commodore’s Cup in 1996. Out of eight Fastnets entered, Sunstone won her class in four.

In the Wake of Heroes

In the Wake of Heroes is sailing's greatest stories introduced by Tom Cunliffe, a renowned sailor, journalist and RCC member.

The book comprises Tom’s 40 favourite extracts from stories of great seamanship from classic yachting books and covers the entire scope of yachting concerns, from small-boat handling to yacht racing to long-distance cruising and exploring.

Introduced in Tom’s quintessential lively, engaging fashion, and illustrated with photos both from the original books and Tom’s own archives, this beautifully packaged book contains a wealth of yachting wisdom and is a collection to be treasured.

It is published by Bloomsbury
Hardback £18.99/eBook £16.99

Voyage of the Harrier by Julian Mustoe Kindle edition on sale at Amazon

Before he tragically lost his boat (see Notices) Julian Mustoe (RCC) published a kindle version of his account of sailing around the world in the wake of The Beagle.

One of the most important ocean voyages in history was the circumnavigation of the world by the survey ship HMS Beagle in the early 1830s, with Charles Darwin aboard as ship’s naturalist. Darwin’s account, published in 1839 as Voyage of the Beagle, has never been out of print.
Voyage of the Harrier, is the story of the first detailed re-enactment ever made of the Beagle’s famous voyage. Between 2001 and 2012 the author in his small sailing yacht Harrier went to nearly every port used, and almost every anchorage visited, by the Beagle. Harrier’s voyage was guided in detail by Robert FitzRoy’s Narrative and Darwin’s Beagle Diary. The Beagle’s voyage involved much labourious survey work and it saw the beginning of Darwin’s personal development as a scientist. Harrier’s voyage included a shipwreck and an attack by smugglers in the Timor Sea. The author’s book, Voyage of the Harrier, combines accounts of the Beagle and Harrier voyages in such a way that the two voyages cast light upon one another. Together, the two narratives help to illuminate the world. See link to Amazon below.